Sewing Bucket List

She’s been a little busy.

Since ‘retiring’ a year or so ago, she hasn’t been taking client work. That means she doesn’t have to quit in the middle of creative juices flowing and then try to get back to it later; she can just keep with a project uninterrupted.

She’s finally gotten to her sewing bucket list. The first one on her mind was a patchwork quilt. As a child, her mother started her three girls doing them for rainy day projects. It has been a thing she has wanted to revisit ever since.

The bucket list seems to increase rather than diminish. This ‘toothbrush rug‘ one of the increases.

A yo yo quilt has long been on the list. She seems to cater to the 40’s style of things. Doesn’t it seem that each generation seems to like what was popular in the era of their mother’s youth?

This T-shirt yarn, Tarn, scrappy rug didn’t turn out well. She couldn’t keep it from ruffling no matter how she tried to do the increases. It’s in a drawer awaiting another life.

A long time on the sewing bucket list was to make a Canadian Smocked pillow. She mastered the smocking but failed to sew the seam before doing the smocking, so the two ends couldn’t be matched. Somehow she failed to do a row that would have made it right. She may turn it into a square pillow. It was supposed to be a bolster.

The thing about researching”how-to’s” is that you run into other fun stuff along the way. This scrappy rug was inspired by a lady on Etsy that makes hats and she was trying to find a tutorial for her technique. She ended up working it out on her own. It’s not easy crocheting with knots, she learned.

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Once in awhile she gets housework done or a project that makes sewing easier. She finally turned these lollipop display stands into thread and bobbin holders.

If you remember, her career was mostly working with clients, in their homes, helping them design their furnishing and window coverings. She had a little stint of trying it on her own and accumulated scores of fabric sample books to help her do that work. While she still had an electric washing machine (she now does all her washing by hand), she tore apart a big bunch of them, washed them and arranged many of them into ensembles she imagined could become something wonderful together. Many, many more books she simply gave away. Well, she is finally taking one box after another to work these imaginings out.

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Art to wear.

She never knows where it will end up when she starts out. She lets the fabrics tell her what to do. Above image is the front. Below image is the back. It went through many gyrations getting to this point. Still more to complete.

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Trapunto detail on the rose.

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The plaid pocket accommodates a small flip phone.

The “Tiny Purse” is the latest project, started with the intention of making a credit card holder for a friend’s upcoming birthday. She got carried away when the fabric told her to do otherwise.

She spent a great deal of the Summer trying desperately still to get her food to grow in the southeastern desert of Arizona. It’s a big challenge, but she did make progress and learned lots of new things.

Now that the cooler, shorter days are here, she will be working inside, spooling around a lot more.

She hopes this post makes up for her long absence from the blog, that you are well and headed toward an enjoyable Winter season.

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Deconstruction Zones

This beautiful hat is available for sale on Etsy. Click the picture to go right to it. Jantiki is the shop name.

This beautiful hat is available for sale on Etsy. Click the picture to go right to it. Jantiki is the shop name.

Deconstruction Zones seem to be everywhere in Ms. SpoolTeacher’s house. Her resources keep growing. Soon, very soon, she will need to start making something with these things (actually she is, some). She dreams up many ideas as she is in the process of deconstructing things…

Scrunchy Flower Idea

Lately one of her life-long friends sent her a fun package with things to up-cycle. Among the items were these scrunchies. Her friend had said some time before that she had stopped wearing them but couldn’t seem to part with them thinking there would be a creative way to use them, wondering if Ms. SpoolTeacher could think of anything.

Ms. SpoolTeacher has been spending some quality time deconstructing items she wants to put to other uses. She decided to utilize a box of thick plastic bags, she had purchased for her shop a couple of years ago, to organize things. (She’s really trying to eliminate plastic from her life now, but no point in just sending them off to a land fill or re-cycle center if there is a better use)

deconstruction zones, organizing with plastic bags

So the scrunchies ended up in one of the bags and she started thinking, “What could they be used for?”.

It wasn’t until she saw that beautiful green hat in the picture at the lead of this post that it hit her. She had had one of the scrunchies curled up in her hand thinking it made a cute flower; but it was so bulky, she couldn’t think what it would be appropriate on. So now she will have to make some hats…

That’s how it goes..

https://www.etsy.com/shop/Jantiki

to visit the shop with this hat in it, click the picture or put this web address in your browser: https://www.etsy.com/shop/Jantiki

She only hopes her creation turns out as lovely as this vintage hat. And she only wishes she had $29 she didn’t need and looked good in hats…oh well…Doesn’t it look Easter Parade-ish?

Easter Parade-ish, Scrunchy Flower Idea

Sheer remnants cut on bias to be used as trim on attire

Rag rug resources

Button and buttonhole panels from the fronts of shirts, deconstructed

The short pieces made from the T-shirt, tarn made from the tops and sleeves

Yo-Yo's piling up

So in between cutting and bagging her Resource Central supplies, she spends as much time as possible out in the yard with her Girls, getting nature’s resources up to snuff for her gardening adventures.

Gertis-The-Mertis-Turtle

Little Red-Haired Girl sniffin rosemary

And “smelling the roses”.. so to speak.

Bloom of the day

Bloom of the day

Ain’t life great!!!

Throwing a Tarn Bowl

Wabi-sabi Tarn bowl

Ms. SpoolTeacher has never worked on a potter’s wheel; but throughout the process of crocheting her Tarn Bowl, she got a sensation that it was a similar experience.

She started out making what was to be a round rug, but after she got to increasing every 8 stitches, she changed her mind. She has never crocheted with tarn (t-shirt yarn) before and is quite certain that she should have been using a larger needle and one that had more traction, (wasn’t metal). Crocheting is something that only through practice does one pick up on the subtleties that can be manipulated to create variables that are either desirable or not , intended or not, and/or an expression of creative license, i.e., art.

She was quite having fun. She was utilizing her acumen and a very good video to remember even this beginning stage of crocheted creations.


She had previously made some t-shirt yarn, tarnĀ as it is called; and as it turned out, the denier was variable as she had differing weights of t-shirt material and she had cut some a little different width than others.

This is all new to her.

T-shirt yarn. Each ball represents a whole shirt

The ball of t-shirt yarn she started with, a muted green/aqua, was cut after the rolls in the above picture. It had seams but she decided to go ahead and try it.

She’s on a learning curve with this and wants to be able to tell others why to or not to use seamed pieces, etc. She kind of likes imperfections anyway. Wabi-sabi! Serene Melancholy. Spiritual Longing. Doesn’t that evoke the language of Art?

[1] “If an object or expression can bring about, within us, a sense of serene melancholy and a spiritual longing, then that object could be said to be wabi-sabi.”[2] “[Wabi-sabi] nurtures all that is authentic by acknowledging three simple realities: nothing lasts, nothing is finished, and nothing is perfect.”[3]

Wabi-sabi tea bowl, 16th century

Wabi-sabi tea bowl, 16th Century. Image courtesy http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wabi-sabi

So as she was sitting on her bed, late at night, watching some thought-provoking recording she’d made (in the days of having TV) of something from Free Speech TV, she decided to quit increasing and make a bowl instead of a rug.

The aqua only lasted long enough to apply about 3 rows, give or take, up the sides before she had to determine which roll of tarn to use next. She chose the gray.

Wabi-sabi Tarn bowl

Wabi-sabi tarn bowl, 21st century, thrown on an “artists” lap

Well, as she got going, she realized that it was quite fatter denier and was making it bulge slightly. She thought about taking it out, but no, she kind of liked that idea and she rolled her fingers around the circumference as she would if she was throwing a clay bowl, seeing if she could pull it up and/or stretch it into aligning with the aqua. She used various tensions with the tarn/yarn in her fingers as she continued on making stitches up the side to see if she could control the bulge. More “imperfections”. All the while, she was thinking it was looking like a bowl some artist had created intentionally that way on her potter’s wheel.

Well, the gray yarn ran out in no time and then what color next? She opted for the white. It had printing on it, so there would be that as a subtle “imperfection” as well. She wasn’t quite sure how tall to make it; but after two rolls of white, both slightly different denier, she decided that it was tall enough.

Wabi-sabi tarn bowl, 21st century, thrown on an "artists" lap

Now for how to finish it off and maybe add handles? (Ms. ST just spent an hour trying to find a tutorial for adding handles to her bowl but all she got was Etsy and Pinterest links without help) After scouring all the images, she thinks she can figure it out on her own.

Oops! Never give up. She thinks she found a tutorial!

But as you can see, it looks rather simple to do.

More rows could be added to make a fatter handle.

She also saw many, many beautiful examples and some interesting ways to finish it off.

She usually likes things rather simple. Why complicate things? Right?

Isn’t this a pretty one? Not made out of t-shirt yarn, but very pretty.

So here are a few more images of her Wabi-sabi tarn bowl, 21st Century …

Wabi-sabi tarn bowl, 21st century, thrown on an "artists" lap Wabi-sabi tarn bowl, 21st century, thrown on an "artists" lap

Wabi-sabi tarn bowl, 21st century, thrown on an "artists" lap

Wabi-sabi tarn bowl, 21st century, thrown on an "artists" lap

It ain’t particularly purdy, but it’s Wabi-sabi to her.

Serenely melancholy is one of her favorite colors! And now she realizes that she photographed it wrong side out. Wabi-sabi her. Tarn it!

Update! Update!!!

Ms. SpoolTeacher turned the bowl right side out and added handles in purple and white. Everything looks better with a touch of purple. Here is the near complete bowl, (just have to tuck in some tails)… and a preview of the next project, a braided rug.

Wabi-sabi tarn bowl, 21st century, with handles and a touch of purple

Handles!

Wabi-sabi tarn bowl, 21st century, thrown on an "artists" lap

Bottom up!

Wabi-sabi tarn bowl, 21st century, with handles and a touch of purple

Strings yet to weave in…

And the next project upcoming, a braided rug from t-shirt yarn…

Braided rug fom t-shirt yarn.

Additional pictures can be viewed at this link.

Available for sale on Etsy:

Wabi-sabi tarn bowl, 21st century, thrown on an "artists" lap

Also available for sale on Etsy:

Tarn Bowl